Branchville  Country   Veterinary  Clinic 
                  Dr. Sherri Talbot-Valerio
12 Maple Ave.,Branchville, N.J. 07826             973-948-PETS (7387)

                                           RESOURCES 
      
For information on the Ebola Virus and pets, Lyme Disease and other tick-borne diseases,  please go to www.cdc.gov 

                                                In some cases, you  may need Adobe Reader to access articles--please go to our Forms page for a link to download it.

Pet Poison Helpline is a 24-hour animal poison control service.  Please be advised that there is a $35 per incident fee, payable by credit card. This fee covers the initial consultation as well as all follow-up calls associated with the management of the case.
http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/




ASPCA POISON CONTROL 24 HOUR HOTLINE:

1-888-426-4435
There is a $65 consultation fee for this service.

What To Do If Your Pet Is Poisoned

from www.aspca.org

Don’t panic.

Take 30 to 60 seconds to safely collect and have at hand any material involved. This may be of great benefit to your vet and/or APCC toxicologists, as they determine what poison or poisons are involved. In the event that you need to take your pet to a local veterinarian, be sure to take the product’s container with you. Also, collect in a sealable plastic bag any material your pet may have vomited or chewed.

Be ready with the following information:

•The species, breed, age, sex, weight and number of animals involved.

•The animal’s symptoms.

•Information regarding the exposure, including the agent (if known), the amount of the agent involved and the time elapsed since the time of exposure.

•Have the product container/packaging available for reference.

Please note: If your animal is having seizures, losing consciousness, is unconscious or is having difficulty breathing, telephone ahead and bring your pet immediately to your local veterinarian or emergency veterinary clinic.
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www.MyDogIsCool.com

Check out this site to see how quickly your car can turn into an oven and overheat your dog.  Even "cool" and cloudy days can be too hot for your pet. 

HEATSTROKE (over heating---increased body temperature) can be fatal. Sign of heatstroke can include excessive panting, pale gums, lethargy, seizures.  SEEK VETERINARY CARE IMMEDIATELY IF YOUR PET BECOMES OVER HEATED--whether in a car or simply outside when the temperature rises.


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DIABETES VIDEO INSTRUCTION

       http://www.felinevideos.vet.cornell.edu/diabetes/index.shtml

To further help you understand diabetes, its regulation, the importance of diet, and the administration of insulin, we recommend the following website video that you can review at home.  While the video is produced with a cat as the subject, much of the information it contains also pertains to dogs.
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Cats & Carriers:
Friends not Foes

 A helpful video offering 5 simple steps for cat owners to use cat-friendly carriers.
 
from catalystcouncil


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egwBo0o2FN8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PET HEALTH INSURANCE:
There are many companies offering pet health insurance, as you will see if you do an online search.  Before you purchase pet health insurance, be sure to compare the benefits of various companies.  Some offer policies for just accidents or illness, others may offer those plus well care reimbursements.  Premiums will vary depending on the coverage you select, and may also vary by your pet's breed and age.  As with human health insurance, deductibles or exclusions may apply, and claims must be filed in a timely fashion.  













SKUNK SHAMPOO
 


Combine:

¼ cup Baking Soda

1 Teaspoon Liquid Dish Soap (Dawn)

1 Quart 3% Hydrogen Peroxide

 

Soak pet in warm water to saturate,

 then apply mix.  Scrub through fur.

 Rinse thoroughly with warm water.

Mix DOES NOT keep—discard any unused portions.

Mix may lighten dark colored fur.


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DEER AND CARS

  Statistically, most car-deer accidents occur in the months of October, November and December, which also coincides with the deer's mating season. It has been noted that more accidents occur during the night, or anytime between dusk and dawn. 

Critter Control provides the following tips to reduce your chances of hitting a deer:

  1. Be aware of posted deer crossing signs.
  2. Remember that in the Fall months deer are most active between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.
  3. Use high beam headlamps as much as possible at night to illuminate the areas from which deer will enter roadways.
  4. Keep in mind that deer generally travel in small groups - if you see one, there is a good possibility others are nearby.
  5. Do not rely on car-mounted deer whistles. (they are not proven to be effective
  6. If a deer collision seems inevitable, trying to swerve out of the way could make you lose control of your vehicle, or move into the path of an oncoming vehicle, so try to stop straight ahead.

    If you do hit a deer and it is still alive, please contact the Local or State Police for assistance.

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PETS THAT NEED HOMES!
Please call our office for information on pets looking for forever homes.
 973-948-PETS (7387)

NEED HOMES:

Cali, spayed female calico


Baby Girl, Cali's daughter, spayed female calico

ADOPTED:

Samantha Toes



JT the beagle




ATHENA





WHY YOU SHOULD ADOPT A PET

It is estimated three to four million dogs and cats are euthanized (“put to sleep”) each year in the United States.

  •  Many people think that animals end up in shelters because they were abused or behaved badly. Most animals in shelters are there because of “people reasons”: divorce, moving, lack of time, and finances are common reasons why pets wind up in shelters.  
  • Adopting a pet is less expensive than buying one. Buying a pet can easily cost $500 to $1000 or more. Animals from many shelters are already spayed or neutered and vaccinated, and some are microchipped, making an adoption fee a bargain.
  • You won’t support puppy or kitten mills if you adopt / rescue.

  • You can get a pet of any age.  Although puppies and kittens are cute, they can require a lot of work to train. An adult or older pet that is already trained may be a better fit for you and your family. Getting an adult dog that is already housetrained and knows basic commands is often much easier than adopting a puppy.
  • Adopted pets are just as loving, intelligent, and loyal as purchased pets.

     PET ADOPTION AGENCIES

    Port Jervis Humane Society
    Port Jervis, NY
    845-856-3677
    www.pjhumane.org

    Father Johns Animal House,
    Lafayette, NJ
    973-300-5909
    www.fatherjohnsanimalhouse.org

    Les Lapins Rescue and Retirement Home,
    (Rabbits)
    Hopatcong NJ
    973-398-5538
    Petfinder
    www.petfinder.com


    O.S.C.A.R.
    Sparta, N.J.
    www.petfinder.com/shelters/NJ133.html



    PETFINDERS ONLINE


     5 REASONS TO SPAY OR NEUTER YOUR PET

    1.) Health benefits:
    * Spaying your female pet helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer.

    * Neutering males can prevent testicular cancer.

    2.) Behavior benefits:
    * Your spayed female cat won't go into "heat." Female cats can go into heat for 4-5 days every three weeks during breeding season. They'll yowl and may urinate more frequently--sometimes all over the house--to try to attract a mate. Female dogs usually go into heat twice yearly and can become moody--and messy!

    * Your neutered male dog or cat won't be as likely to roam away from home. Non-neutered male pets will do just about anything to find a willing female--dogs may dig out under fences and both dogs and cats will become escape artists to get out of the house. Once outside, they risk injury (or worse) in traffic or fights with other males or wildlife.

    * Neutered pets focus on their human families. Unneutered dogs and cats may mark their territory by spraying, and many aggression issues can be avoided by neutering.

    3.) It's cost effective to spay / neuter.
    The cost of spaying or neutering is a lot less than properly caring for a litter--especially if there are birthing complications requiring a C-section. Spaying/neutering costs less than continually treating your pets for wounds or injuries they may sustain while looking for a mate.

    4.) It's good for your community.
    Stray animals (and yes, if your pet is at large it's considered a 'stray') prey on or can be attacked by wildlife, cause car accidents, may bite, spread diseases and cause over population. Every year, millions of dogs and cats (and not just feral ones) are euthanized for lack of homes. Spaying and neutering means your animals won't contribute to over population.

    5.) Myth busting:
    * Your pet WON'T get fat from the surgery. Lack of exercise and over-feeding is what causes weight gain.

    * Children do not need to 'experience the miracle of birth' at the expense of the puppies or kittens. Letting your pets have offspring that you have no intention of keeping is not a good lesson, especially when so many animals wind up in shelters and euthanized. There are lots of books and videos available to teach children about birth in a responsible way.

    * Just because your pet may be "pure-bred" doesn't mean it should reproduce. Most puppies and kittens sold in pet shops have "papers" but come from puppy mills and are not "quality" examples of their breed. Some are "designer breeds" which are simply a mix of two (or more) AKC recognized breeds that have been given a cute name ( for example, Puggle and LabraDoodle.) Responsible breeding takes careful consideration of genetic and medical issues and a life-long commitment to each animal bred.


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    TRAVELLING WITH PETS: 

    PETS ON THE GO
     
    http://www.petsonthego.com

    PET TRAVEL INFORMATION SITE
     
    http://www.pettravel.com/


    AIRLINE REGULATIONS
    http://www.pettravel.com/airline_rules.cfm

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    LOST/FOUND PETS
    If lost, these are tips to help recover your pet.
    We recommend you have your pets have a MICROCHIP as permanent identification. Also have your pet wear a collar that has your current phone number embroidered into it and place ID tags (not just a rabies tag) on it with your current contact information on those tags.

    * Contact your local Animal Control Officer

    * Put up flyers. 
         **Include:  Name
                            Age
                            Sex (note neutered/spayed) 
                            Area lost from
                            Date lost
                            Wearing collar, ID
                             Microchip number 
                             Description 
                             PICTURE !!                      
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    *  Many people won't recognize a pet        
                           by it's written description alone.
                          (Example: Black & White Cat doesn't
                           describe your pet adequately.)

    * Put an ad in local newspapers and contact local radio stations. Many offer free notices.

    * Places to put flyers and/or contact:

       Pet Shops           Groomers    Veterinarians
       Shelters              Post Office    Local Shops
       State / National Parks      Campgounds         
       Police (State & Local)    Microchip Registry
       Internet Sites (Breed & Pet Rescues)

    PET FINDER 
    http://www.petfinder.com

     
    Home Again Microchip Registry  
    http://public.homeagain.com


    USA MICROCHIP DATABASE
    http://registermicrochip.com/



    AKC MICRO-CHIPS

    http://www.akccar.org/

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    GROOMING:

    SNIPS-N-TAILS DOG GROOMING
    8 Maple Ave., Port Jervis, N.Y. 12771
    845-858-TAIL (8245)

    BARK 'N PURR PET GROOMING
    13 Main St., Branchville, N.J. 07826
    973-948-2225



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    BOARDING FACILITIES:
    KOUNTRY KENNELS
    Sandyston, NJ
    http://kountrykennelsnj.com/
    SAWKILL FARM
    Milford, PA
    http://www.sawkillfarm.net/
    KERFREE KENNELS
    Sparta, N.J.
    www.kerfreekennels.com






    TRAINING:


    Cesar Milan
    http://www.cesarsway.com/


    Golden Rule School for Dogs Sandy Ver Sprill, Instructor
    Andover, NJ 973-786-5229
    http://www.goldenruleschoolfordogsllc.com/



    Tri States Dog Obedience Club, Shohola, PA 570-296-5594
    http://www.tristatedogobedienceclub.org

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    GRIEF  COUNSELING:



    Rainbow Bridge:
    www.petloss.com


    Karen Ann Quinlin Center, Newton, NJ

    Diana Sebzda 973-383-0115
    http://www.karenannquinlanhospice.org/bereavement/



    Tufts University

    508-839-7966

    http://www.tufts.edu/vet/petloss/



    Washington State University
    866-266-8635


    http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/PLHL/




    ASPCA Pet Loss and Children
    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-loss/pet-loss-and-children.aspx



    Horse Loss Support
    www.hoofbeats-in-heaven.com



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    WILDLIFE:
    Please note that wildlife has to stay within the state it is found:

    Contact our office for information on when and how to safely rescue wildlife.   Many times a wild animal is not in need of human intervention--an experienced wildlife rehabilitator can help you determine if a rescue is necessary.




    NEW JERSEY:


    Wild Baby Rescue Center,   Blairstown, NJ

    908-362-9453
    http://wildbabyrescue.org


    NJ Toll Free Wildlife Hotline: 877-472-8945


    NEW YORK  Wildlife Rehabilitators:

    http://www.nyswrc.org/counties.htm



    PENNSYLVANIA Wildlife Rehabilitators:

    PA Wildlife Rehabilitators
     
    http://www.pawr.com


    Pocono Rehab Center   Pennsylvania
    http://poconowildlife.com/


    Any state:
    Bats

    http://www.batcon.org/

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    OTHER PETS

    RABBITS:

    Adopt a rabbit or get great info on care etc. at
    House Rabbit Society

    http://www.rabbit.org/


    GUINEA PIGS
    http://www.guinealynx.info



    RATS & MICE (American Fancy Rat and Mouse Assoc.)
    http://www.afrma.org/rmindex.htm


    HAMSTERS  (ASPCA care info)
     http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/small-pet-care/hamster-care.aspx

    BIRDS:
    Hot Spot for Birds

    http://www.multiscope.com/hotspot/index.html


    FERRETS:

    Ferret Central
    http://www.ferretcentral.org/


    GERBILS:
    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/small-pet-care/gerbil-care.aspx


    American Gerbil Society

    http://agsgerbils.org/Learn/Gerbil_Care_Handbook/index.php














































































































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